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What to do about Depression


symptoms of depression

This is the second of a two-part series on depression. In this issue, I will describe how depression is treated and prevented. If you or someone close to you suffers from depression, it is important to educate yourself about it and seek treatment from qualified mental health professionals.

 

There are three basic ways to treat depression: psychotherapy, self-help, and medication.

 

Many people respond best to a combination of two or more methods.

Psychotherapy: Exploring one’s beliefs and ways of thinking, and learning new ways of thinking and behaving, with the guidance of a Houston professional.

Self-help: Exploring one’s beliefs and ways of thinking on one’s own.

Medication: Altering one’s brain chemistry by taking antidepressant medication.

 

A physician may recommend medication when four conditions exist:

  1. The client’s depression is severe.
  2. The client has suffered at least two previous depressive episodes.
  3. There is a family history of depression.
  4. The client asks for medication only and refuses psychotherapy.

 

Treatment without Medicine

One of the leading methods for treating depression is cognitive therapy. Cognitive therapists help depressed clients feel better by identifying how negative ways of thinking are making him or her feel bad. The client analyzes his or her thoughts and beliefs, and learns to substitute more healthy ways of thinking and believing (positive self-talk).

 

Many mental health professionals believe that the ideal treatment of clinical depression is medication in conjunction with psychotherapy.

Prevention of Depression

Depression can often be prevented. It is especially important to take preventive action if you are aware that you have predisposing factors such as a history of trauma or family history of depression.

 

Identify your risk factors and be aware of where you are vulnerable. Each of us has unique risk factors, such as things we were taught in our families of origin, values we have learned, and the presence or absence of a family history of depression. Anything that has been learned can be unlearned and replaced with something healthier.

Learn to manage stress. You can learn proven techniques for calming and relaxing yourself. Consider taking a stress management class or buying a set of relaxation CDs to practice calming yourself every day.

Learn problem-solving skills. Many people who develop depression never learned problem-solving skills. They need to develop the ability to see problems from many viewpoints and to look for a variety of solutions.

Build your life around things you can control. Learn to recognize what you can control and what you can’t. Avoid spending much effort on situations that won’t pay off for you or that you really have no control over.

Practice self-acceptance. Instead of rejecting the parts of yourself you don’t like, learn to manage them more productively.

Become aware of selective perception. Observe how you generate ideas and opinions about people and events. Remember that these are just your views, not necessarily objective facts.

Focus on the future, not the past. Depressed people tend to be focused on the past. People who set goals and focus on the future tend to be more positive about life.

Develop a sense of purpose. Many depressed people lack a sense of purpose or meaning. This means they have no goals and nothing in the future drawing them forward. To prevent depression, develop your sense of purpose and meaning.

Strengthen your emotional boundaries and set limits. Boundaries define your role in a social situation. They determine how you will or won’t behave in a given situation. Having clear, strong boundaries is empowering, while boundary violations make you feel victimized and helpless. Setting limits means having and enforcing rules for the behaviors you expect in a relationship.

Build positive and healthy relationships. Think about what you need from others in relationships. Learn to read people and trust your instincts about which people are good for you.

Avoid isolation. Talk to others about what’s going on with you. If you keep your thoughts to yourself, you may be unaware that your thoughts are negative or distorted. If you share them with another person, you can become more objective. Additionally, talking about your feelings helps you to release them and let them go.

Write in a journal. Journal writing is a great way to get in touch with the thoughts and feelings surrounding your depression. Journaling can also help you with problem-solving and creativity, which may help you find you way out of depression.

Signs That Professional Therapy Is Needed

  1. Thinking about death or suicide. This is always dangerous and you should see a professional therapist immediately.
  2. When symptoms of depression continue for a long time, you may need professional help. Acute responses to events (such as trauma, job loss) are normal, but they should not last beyond a reasonable time.
  3. Your ability to function is impaired by your depression. Seek help before your life situation deteriorates to a serious level.
  4. You have become so isolated that you have no one with whom to test reality. Seek someone out to share your thoughts and feelings with.
  5. Depressive symptoms have become severe.

 

Read more about our depression treatment services.

To get started now give us a call to schedule an appointment at 832-559-2622 or schedule an appointment online.

Recommended Reading:

 

symptoms of depressionThe Depression Cure: The 6-Step Program to Beat Depression without Drugs

In the past decade, depression rates have skyrocketed, and one in four Americans will suffer from major depression at some point in their lives. Where have we gone wrong? Dr. Stephen Ilardi sheds light on our current predicament and reminds us that our bodies were never designed for the sleep-deprived, poorly nourished, frenzied pace of twenty-first century life.

 

symptoms of depressionThe Feeling Good Handbook

In Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy Dr David Burns introduced a groundbreaking, drug-free treatment for depression that has helped millions of people around the world. Now, in this long-awaited sequel, he reveals powerful new techniques and provides practical exercises that will help you cope with problems and learn how to make life a happier, more exhilarating experience.

 

symptoms of depressionBreaking the Patterns of Depression

Breaking the Patterns of Depression defines what causes depression and, best of all, clarifies what can be done about it. With this knowledge in hand, readers can control their depression, rather than having depression control them.

 

symptoms of depression

Ten Days to Self-Esteem

In Ten Days to Self-esteem, Dr. David Burns presents innovative, clear, and compassionate methods that will help you identify the causes of your mood slumps and develop a more positive outlook on life.

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Rachel Eddins, M.Ed., LPC-S, CGP
Rachel’s passion is to help people discover their personal gifts and strengths to achieve self-acceptance, create a healthy relationship with food, mind and body, and find meaning and fulfillment in work and life roles. She helps people create nurturance and healing from within to restore balance and enoughness and overcome binge eating, emotional eating, anxiety, depression and lack of career fulfillment.

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